Trunk or Treat a Success

HPCAV participated in our first Trunk or Treat at the Halloween Spooky Hoopla on Saturday, October 15 at the High Point Athletic Complex. Tim Ilderton of Ilderton Dodge loaned us a pickup truck to display our sign. Comfortable chairs, handouts and plenty of candy were all we needed to engage with everyone who stopped by. We ran out of candy, but not out of words! Working together, community partners and individuals, we can reduce violence in High Point.

Firearms by Felon Initiative

Crime Stoppers of High Point is beginning a new program that targets felons who are carrying illegal firearms. Anyone who reports information leading to the arrest of a felon in possession of a gun could earn $500. This effort is based on a successful program by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department.

Tips can be made by calling Crime Stoppers at 336-889-4000 or downloading the P3 Tips mobile
app. Tips are always anonymous.

It’s another way our residents can help law enforcement make High Point safer for everyone.

Dedicated HPU Student Benefits HPCAV

Meet Elise Coby, a junior at High Point University (HPU), pictured here with Gretta Bush, our Board President and Jim Summey, our Executive Director. Her Persuasive Speaking class required her to give a “Speech of Advocacy”. Realizing domestic/partner violence and violence in general were issues of concern to her, Elise researched local organizations and chose HPCAV as the subject for her speech project. She excelled in her presentation and was awarded first place. She took it a step further and created a crowd funding campaign, raising $765 for our organization.

Elise, we are very grateful for your support and your advocacy for HPCAV on campus and beyond!

One Man’s Answer to “Why?”

High Point Community Against Violence has always focused on data – the answer to “who” is committing the violence in our city. Data has informed our strategic decision-making: which neighborhoods to target; which people to target. We have focused on the quantitative, not the qualitative. But thanks to William Hill and WFDD, we have the chance to hear one man’s answer to “why” someone commits violent acts.

Listen to it, read it or both.

William Hill and Jim Summey, HPCAV

Job Fair Coming Up

23 Year Look Back

The slow down and isolation of 2020 gave some of our volunteers the time to look back and catalogue what HPCAV has done and meant to our city and the people who live and work here. The end result of that reflection is “Building a Safer High Point.” It’s an easy read and will answer many of the questions you may have about what we do and why. And maybe it will inspire you to join us as we continue working to make High Point safer for everyone.

You choose: e-book or PDF.

Focused Deterrence Works

Indexed crime or crime per capita is shown in the chart below, beginning in 1992 and ending in 2019. We began using the Focused Deterrence model in 1997, working with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and the community. Since then, our violent crime has decreased by 58% while the city’s population continues to grow at 50%. Over 2000 people have been notified. Of those, four out of five people do not reoffend. It’s not the perfect answer for all violence, but it works.

Focused deterrence overview

Take a look!

HPCAV has been working to reduce violence in High Point for over 21 years. If you wonder whether our work makes a difference, hear what our clients have to say in our newest video.

Domestic Violence Strategy Gains National Attention

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence has invited the High Point Police Department to present information about our Offender Focused Domestic Violence Initiative (DVI) that was begun in 2012 at its national conference in September.  Based on the Violent Crime Focused Deterrence model, the DVI has helped reduce repeat domestic violence offenses in High Point.  Almost 3500 offenders have been “put on notice” over the past six years of implementation.   And while the program is not perfect – domestic violence continues to happen – it has made a difference, more than other strategies used in the past.

Read more about our DVI in this article from the Greensboro News and Record.

Our Domestic Violence Model Goes National

We are proud to share the news that the National Network for Safe Communities (NNSC) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is launching a new intimate partner violence intervention initiative, based on the successful intervention model we developed here in High Point.  Three pilot cities will be chosen to replicate the model.  This initiative is being funded by a $1.6 million grant from the Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women.

“While we do not receive any of the money,” said Ken Schultz, High Point Chief of Police, “the work and efforts of everyone, to include all of our many partners who have contributed to the success of our program, will now be spread throughout the country and will benefit many more victims of domestic violence.”

More from John Jay College